The Kennedy Legacy

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Posts tagged Jackie Kennedy

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"When Jackie gave birth to Caroline, Jack arrived at the hospital carrying a bouquet of her favorite flowers, periwinkle-blue irises, and was the first to lay their daughter in her arms. He boasted of her being the prettiest baby in the nursery, and his voice broke when he described her to his best friend, Lem Billings, who had never seen him happier or more emotional."

"When Jackie gave birth to Caroline, Jack arrived at the hospital carrying a bouquet of her favorite flowers, periwinkle-blue irises, and was the first to lay their daughter in her arms. He boasted of her being the prettiest baby in the nursery, and his voice broke when he described her to his best friend, Lem Billings, who had never seen him happier or more emotional."

(Source: vanityfair.com)

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“My mother was always reading! That’s the image I have when I think of her. In New York, she’d be reading when I came home from school or in the evenings. In the summer, we’d swim in the mornings, and in the afternoons she’d read on the porch. She always said that reading the memoirs of Versailles was the best preparation she had for the White House, because the way people behaved at court was like how they did around the president. She had a deep engagement with literature, history, plays, and poetry. They gave her strength, even in the difficult times. Because she knew about ancient Greece and read the plays written back then, she knew about suffering and about perseverance.”
— Caroline Kennedy

 

“My mother was always reading! That’s the image I have when I think of her. In New York, she’d be reading when I came home from school or in the evenings. In the summer, we’d swim in the mornings, and in the afternoons she’d read on the porch. She always said that reading the memoirs of Versailles was the best preparation she had for the White House, because the way people behaved at court was like how they did around the president. She had a deep engagement with literature, history, plays, and poetry. They gave her strength, even in the difficult times. Because she knew about ancient Greece and read the plays written back then, she knew about suffering and about perseverance.”

— Caroline Kennedy

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Katie Holmes to revisit Jackie Kennedy role in “The Kennedys — After Camelot”

Katie Holmes is returning to her role as Jacqueline Kennedy in “The Kennedys — After Camelot,” the follow-up to Reelz Channel’s 2011 miniseries “The Kennedys.”

Holmes, who starred as the former first lady in “The Kennedys,” will reprise that role for the new four-hour miniseries, and will also serve as executive producer and direct one of the episodes. Jon Cassar, who directed all eight episodes of “The Kennedys,” will direct the other three and also executive produce.

“‘The Kennedys’ was a brilliant execution of storytelling based on the lives of one of the world’s best known families,” Reelz CEO Stan E. Hubbard said in a statement. “Katie elegantly portrayed Jackie Kennedy in the first miniseries and now will continue the role as Jackie grows into the Jackie O that the world knows best. Katie is brave, committed and perfect for this role. She is a strong, talented woman who understands how special and respected Jackie Kennedy, and then Jackie Onassis was, as an international icon.”

The new miniseries, based on J. Randy Taraborrelli’s “After Camelot: A Personal History of the Kennedy Family (1968 to the Present),” begins filming in spring 2015, with a planned premiere on Reelz sometime in 2016.

(Source: cbsnews.com)

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Never-before-seen wedding photos of John and Jacqueline Kennedy

A previously unseen collection of photos from the wedding of John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline will be auctioned off this month. 

 The unpublished negatives were taken by freelance photographer Arthur Burges, who was asked to be a backup photographer when the Kennedys wed in Newport, Rhode Island, on September 12, 1953.

They were discovered in his darkroom by his family after his death in 1993.

 There are 13 negatives, each with a printout as well, which include four of the newlywed couple, two of the entire wedding party, as well as shots of the cake, reception, and wedding attendees.

The wedding, considered by many to be one of the biggest social events of the decade, if not the century, drew an estimated 700 guests at St. Mary’s Church. 

Almost 1,200 attended the reception that would follow at Hammersmith Farm, Jackie’s childhood home.

And the photos are just the beginning of the Kennedy memorabilia being auctioned off.

Also for sale is  a 1963 John and Jacqueline Kennedy holiday card, signed mere days before the assassination; a John F. Kennedy presidential document from 1962, that appoints an African-American woman to the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity; and a rare twice-signed 1952 JFK letter on an ‘appointment to the Coast Guard Academy.’

Click here to see more pictures

(Source: Daily Mail)

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These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.

(Source: jfk-and-jackie, via jj-kennedy)

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Suddenly, everything that had been a liability before—your hair, that you spoke French, you didn’t just adore to campaign… When we got in the White House, all the things that I had always done suddenly became wonderful… and I was so happy for Jack… Because you know, it made him so happy—it made me so happy. So those were our happiest years.
Jacqueline Kennedy on captivating the world


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New York Times bestselling author Christopher Andersen delivers another dramatic installment in the lives of the Kennedys, including new details about JFK Jr., his relationship with his mother, his many girlfriends, and the night of his tragic death.At the heart of The Good Son (October 2014)is the most important relationship in JFK Jr.’s life: that with his mother, the beautiful and mysterious Jackie Kennedy Onassis. Andersen explores his reactions to his mother’s post-Dallas suicidal depression and growing dependence on prescription drugs (as well as men); how Jackie felt about the women in her son’s life, from Madonna and Sarah Jessica Parker, to Daryl Hannah and Carolyn Bessette, to his turbulent marriage; the senseless plane crash the took his life; the aftermath of shock, loss, grief, and confusion; and much more. Offering new insights into the intense, tender, often stormy relationship between this iconic mother and son, The Good Sonis a riveting, bittersweet biography for lovers of all things Kennedy.

New York Times bestselling author Christopher Andersen delivers another dramatic installment in the lives of the Kennedys, including new details about JFK Jr., his relationship with his mother, his many girlfriends, and the night of his tragic death.

At the heart of The Good Son (October 2014)is the most important relationship in JFK Jr.’s life: that with his mother, the beautiful and mysterious Jackie Kennedy Onassis. Andersen explores his reactions to his mother’s post-Dallas suicidal depression and growing dependence on prescription drugs (as well as men); how Jackie felt about the women in her son’s life, from Madonna and Sarah Jessica Parker, to Daryl Hannah and Carolyn Bessette, to his turbulent marriage; the senseless plane crash the took his life; the aftermath of shock, loss, grief, and confusion; and much more. Offering new insights into the intense, tender, often stormy relationship between this iconic mother and son, The Good Sonis a riveting, bittersweet biography for lovers of all things Kennedy.

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May 29, 1964: Jackie Kennedy’s Return to Arlington

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By Nicolaus Mills, professor of American Studies at Sarah Lawrence College

Fifty years ago on May 29, 1964, Jackie Kennedy, accompanied by her two children, returned to Arlington National Cemetery. There she placed a sprig of lilies of the valley on President Kennedy’s grave.

The occasion was JFK’s 47th birthday, and Mrs. Kennedy’s homage seemed only natural. But today it is possible to see more than a tribute to her husband in Mrs. Kennedy’s actions. It is also possible to see her deciding the time had come for her and the nation to end their period of mourning.

The day, which was intensely covered by the media, began with Mrs. Kennedy attending mass at St. Matthew’s Roman Catholic Cathedral in Washington, where Bishop Phillip M. Hannan, who had eulogized the president following his assassination, gave the requiem sermon. Mrs. Kennedy, who had been so stoic at her husband’s burial six months earlier, wore no veil on this occasion and allowed herself to be seen crying openly.

A crowd of 1,000 people was waiting on the hillside across the Potomac when Mrs. Kennedy visited President Kennedy’s gravesite after the service, but it was as if Mrs. Kennedy looked on this spring day as one in which she was free to express her full range of feelings without worrying about being judged.

She knelt by the president’s grave, then watched as her son took the gold tie clasp in the form of his father’s World War II boat, PT-109, that he had on his coat, and placed it on the pine boughs covering the grave.

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By 4:30 p.m, Mrs. Kennedy was at the Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, home of her father-in-law, Joseph P. Kennedy, for an international telecast on President Kennedy’s life, but the most revealing indication of the specialness the day held for her came in the interview she did for the May 29 Life magazine.

On December 6 Mrs. Kennedy had been the subject of a Life cover story. In a widely remembered interview with journalist Theodore White, she had made a point of comparing the Kennedy administration to King Arthur’s legendary Camelot.  Referencing the popular Lerner and Loewe Broadway musical Camelot, she had told White that the specialness her husband and his administration had achieved was too unique to be duplicated.

“She came back to the idea that transfixed her,” White wrote. “Don’t let it be forgot, that was there was a spot, for one brief shining moment that was known as Camelot—and it will never be that way again,” White quoted Mrs. Kennedy as saying.

In her Life interviewof May 29, Mrs. Kennedy was still elegiac about her husband, but this time she was not preoccupied with the idea of the Kennedy administration as mythic. She spoke instead about preparing an exhibit of the president’s mementos that would tour the country and be used to raise funds for the Kennedy Library.

The point of the library, she stressed, was to let the president’s example be a guide to the future, not just evoke nostalgia for the past. The ’60s, Mrs. Kennedy was implicitly saying, needed a fresh start, and she was not going to stand in the way of that fresh start or turn herself into a professional widow.

Two months later, Mrs. Kennedy announced that she was giving up her home in Georgetown and moving to New York. The move freed her from the crowds that gathered daily in Georgetown to watch her comings and goings, but above all, the move let her start a new life on terms of her choosing.

In New York, Mrs. Kennedy became a leading figure in the city’s cultural life. The preservation of St. Bartholomew’s Church on Park Avenue and, most important, the preservation of Grand Central Station, which for a time during the ’70s lost its landmark designation, were among her triumphs.

“Jackie Onassis will save us,” the famed modern architect Philip Johnson commented when she took the lead in the fight to stop a proposed 59-story office tower from being erected over Grand Central Station. Johnson’s praise, made in 1975, captures how dramatically Mrs. Kennedy altered the public’s view of her and how easy it is to forget, living as we do in the age of Hillary Clinton and Michelle Obama, that, prior to the ’60s, presidential wives were seen but rarely heard, especially after their husbands left office. 

In deciding what to do after she moved away from Washington, Mrs. Kennedy had before her only the modern example of Eleanor Roosevelt, who, following her husband’s death, took an active role in the United Nations and continued writing her newspaper column. But Mrs. Roosevelt was in her sixties when her husband died after 12 years in office. In 1964 Jackie Kennedy was just 35, the widow of a first-term president, when she began setting historical precedents of her own.

(Source: thedailybeast.com)

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Jackie Kennedy and her son John Jr peeking out of a window of their Fifth Avenue home to watch the St. Patrick’s Day Parade pass by, they spotted Bobby Kennedy and waved and yelled to him, 1968.

Jackie Kennedy and her son John Jr peeking out of a window of their Fifth Avenue home to watch the St. Patrick’s Day Parade pass by, they spotted Bobby Kennedy and waved and yelled to him, 1968.

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