The Kennedy Legacy

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"I’m really proud of my family, I mean my parents, I can’t imagine having better parents and a more wonderful brother so I feel very fortunate that they are my family. You know I wish they were here but my own family, my children, my husband, are really my family"

- Caroline Kennedy

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In 2002, Max Kennedy, one of the sons of Kennedy’s brother Robert, traveled to the Solomons with the National Geographic expedition to meet the islanders whose courage he had heard about since childhood. In an emotional high point in the film, Kumana sobs as the younger Kennedy embraces him.
Max Kennedy presented Kumana and Gasa with gifts, including a letter from another brother, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, who wrote that President Kennedy “never forgot you.”
"Both of them were extraordinarily charismatic men," Max Kennedy said this week about Kumana and Gasa, who died in 2005.He described the day he spent with Kumana as full of laughter."He was very, very funny and had a great sense of irony, which I think President Kennedy also had," Max Kennedy said. "He was wearing a T-shirt that is very popular in the Solomon Islands. It read ‘I Rescued JFK.’"

In 2002, Max Kennedy, one of the sons of Kennedy’s brother Robert, traveled to the Solomons with the National Geographic expedition to meet the islanders whose courage he had heard about since childhood. In an emotional high point in the film, Kumana sobs as the younger Kennedy embraces him.

Max Kennedy presented Kumana and Gasa with gifts, including a letter from another brother, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, who wrote that President Kennedy “never forgot you.”

"Both of them were extraordinarily charismatic men," Max Kennedy said this week about Kumana and Gasa, who died in 2005.

He described the day he spent with Kumana as full of laughter.

"He was very, very funny and had a great sense of irony, which I think President Kennedy also had," Max Kennedy said. "He was wearing a T-shirt that is very popular in the Solomon Islands. It read ‘I Rescued JFK.’"

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

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Fisherman who saved JFK’s life during WWII dies

In Solomon Islands, way out in the ocean, far off the coast of northwest Australia, a 93-year-old man died on August 6.

His name was Eroni Kumana and he is the man who, in 1943, rescued a young U.S. Naval Lieutenant who was stranded out in the sea.

That navy man was former President John F. Kennedy.

He and his crew had been on patrol when their boat was broken in half by a Japanese destroyer.

Kennedy and 10 other survivors had to swim three miles to a coral reef.

Kumana just happened to be out in a canoe on that day, more than 70 years ago. He gave the Americans food and Kennedy sent him away with a “help” message etched on a coconut. Kumana helped save all the men.

And on his oval office desk, JFK used that same coconut as a paperweight.

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(Source: wgntv.com)

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Suddenly, everything that had been a liability before—your hair, that you spoke French, you didn’t just adore to campaign… When we got in the White House, all the things that I had always done suddenly became wonderful… and I was so happy for Jack… Because you know, it made him so happy—it made me so happy. So those were our happiest years.
Jacqueline Kennedy on captivating the world


Filed under John F. Kennedy Jacqueline Kennedy Jack Kennedy Jackie Kennedy JFK Kennedy Jackie

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Hillary Clinton or Elizabeth Warren? Kennedys Unsure of Whom to Support for President

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As each major political party prepares to pick a potential presidential candidate for 2016, one name in particular seems to be increasingly on the tongue of some Democrats. And her name is not Hillary Clinton.

Elizabeth Warren, the senior US Senator from Massachusetts, has emerged as a favorite for some members of one of the most diehard Democratic dynasties American politics has ever seen, according to a new report.

The Bay State’s own Kennedy clan is reportedly courting Sen. Warren to challenge Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination to run for the president of the United States.

Sen. Warren, who as recently as last month told The Boston Globe that she had no intention of becoming a presidential candidate — at least not for 2016 — has apparently left the Democratic loyalties of the Kennedys a bit split.

The New York Post reported:

The question of whom to back in the 2016 presidential race has split the Kennedys down the middle. Robert Kennedy’s widow, Ethel, and their eldest son, former US Rep. Joe Kennedy II, favor Warren — the darling of the party’s left-wing base who now sits in Ted Kennedy’s old seat — while Bobby Jr. and Max Kennedy remain loyal to Hillary Clinton.


Caroline Kennedy has already expressed in great detail her allegiance 
to Team Hillary.

The Post goes on to report that both women were recently invited separately to the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port for an “audition” of sorts.

Sen. Warren’s camp responded swiftly and unequivocally denied the claims made in the New York Post article. “This story is completely made up,” Lacey J. Rose, Sen. Warren’s press secretary, told Boston.com.

Sen. Warren may have endeared herself to the Kennedys for winning the former Senate seat of that family’s patriarch, Ted Kennedy, and ascribing to many of the ideals that the late, veritable “Massachusetts Senator for life” championed. Shereportedly “came to the compound breathing fire about the need to rein in corporate America.”

According to an earlier report, President Barack Obama has given his chief political advisor the green light to coax Warren into running, underscoring the still simmering beef between Clinton and Obama, one-time presidential primary rivals.

Former Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank has also reportedly encouraged Sen. Warren to run for president, thought he’s apparently not sure if her efforts would be in vain or not.

On the flip side, some of Sen. Warren’s biggest donors are discouraging her from considering a presidential run, with one supporter in particular saying, “I really like Elizabeth, but if Hillary is in the race it just makes no sense.”

A poll released last month shows Sen. Warren is trailing Clinton by double-digits for the Democratic presidential nomination.

(Source: Boston.com)

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Ambassador Caroline Kennedy Attends Hiroshima Memorial Service

America’s ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy, attended the annual memorial service, remembering that day 69 years ago when the US dropped an atomic bomb on the city.

It’s unusual for the American ambassador to attend the memorial. Kennedy’s appearance marks only the 4th time a US ambassador has taken part.

Ms. Kennedy did not give a speech or lay a wreath at the ceremony, according to the city of Hiroshima. “This is a day for somber reflection and a renewed commitment to building a more peaceful world,” the ambassador said in a statement released by the U.S. Embassy.

As the only country to have suffered atomic bomb attacks, Japan “has the obligation to realize a world without nuclear weapons,” Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said in his speech during the ceremony in Hiroshima. Mr. Abe also pledged that Japan will continue to ban production, possession or permitting the introduction of nuclear weapons in the country.

Although Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui did not touch on Mr. Abe’s efforts to revise Japan’s constitution, he kept the government in check by mentioning in his speech that the country has enjoyed 69 years of peace thanks to the document’s “sublime pacifism.”

Following the ceremony, representatives of atomic bombing victims met with Mr. Abe and requested that his cabinet withdraw its decision to pursue the right to collective self-defense.

The prime minister replied that the government’s intention is to provide peace and protect the lives of the Japanese public. He explained that the change is not meant to enable Japan to participate in war.

The ceremony, attended by approximately 45,000 people, began at 8 a.m. An additional 5,507 people were added to the registers of names of fallen atomic bomb victims, bringing the total number to 292,325.

Those present at the ceremony held a minute of silence at 8:15 a.m., the time the atomic bomb was dropped on the city. The attack caused the deaths of approximately 140,000 people in Hiroshima by the end of 1945. Another 70,000 people died in Nagasaki three days later due to the second U.S. atomic bombing on Japan.

Ms. Kennedy is also expected to attend the ceremony of the atomic bombings in Nagasaki on Aug. 9.

Abe’s decision to revise the Japanese constitution isn’t as controversial as it would have been a few years ago. Many Japanese realize that their nation cannot put total reliance on America for its defense anymore. The point was driven home by China’s recent aggressiveness in the South China Sea and America’s tepid response.

The Hiroshima ceremony is non-political,  but Kennedy’s presence has made waves both here and in Japan. Many Japanese believe it inappropriate that a representative from the country that inflicted mass destruction on their homeland should attend the memorial. Some Americans believe that a high ranking US official attending the ceremony is tantamount to endorsing the Japanese view that dropping the bombs were unnecessary.

(Source: pjmedia.com)

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Robert Kennedy Jr.’s belief in autism-vaccine connection, and its political peril

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The Washington Post

By Keith Kloor

Sen. Barbara Mikulski listened impassively 
as Robert Kennedy Jr. made his case. He had to talk over the din in the marbled hallway just outside the Senate chambers, where he was huddled with Mikulski, two of her aides and three allies of his who had come to Washington for this April meeting.

Kennedy, a longtime environmental activist and an attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council,  had thought Mikulski would be receptive to an issue that has consumed him for a decade, even as friends and associates have told him repeatedly that it’s a lost cause. But she grew visibly impatient the longer he talked.

A mercury-containing preservative known as thimerosal, once used widely in childhood vaccines, is associated with an array of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, Kennedy told her, summarizing a body of scientific research he and a team of investigators had assembled. Thimerosal, which is an antifungal and antiseptic agent, was taken out of those vaccines in 2001, but it is still used in some flu vaccines. If it was dangerous enough to be removed from pediatric vaccines, Kennedy contended, why was it safe at all? What’s more, he said, the federal government knew of the dangers all along. These were claims he had made in the past, both publicly and in private conversations with other Democrats in Congress, none of whom have taken him seriously.

The Maryland Democrat turned from Kennedy without a word. “I want to hear what you have to say,” Mikulski said, looking up at the lean man standing next to her. Mark Hyman, a physician and best-selling author, is Kennedy’s chief collaborator on a then-unpublished book titled “Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak,”  which is scheduled to come out next week. The book argues that ethylmercury — a component of thimerosal — is harmful to human health. (Not so in trace amounts, scientific authorities have concluded.)

“The bottom line,” Hyman said to Mikulski: “We shouldn’t be injecting a neurotoxin into pregnant women and children.” Thimerosal should be taken out of the flu vaccine, Hyman and Kennedy argued.

Mikulski didn’t react, except to suggest they contact Sen. Bernie Sanders, who “cares about brain health” and oversees a related subcommittee.

As the meeting broke up, Mikulski’s brusque disposition toward Kennedy softened. “We miss your uncle here every day,” she said, referring to Senator Edward Kennedy, , a tenacious public health advocate during his long Senate career. He died of cancer in 2009.

Robert Kennedy Jr. said nothing. He was used to getting the brush-off by now. And he was already thinking ahead to his next move.

Robert Kennedy Jr belongs to a storied political family whose tragedies are woven into the American fabric. The third of Robert and Ethel’s 11 children, he was 9 when Lee Harvey Oswald killed his Uncle John, the 35th president. He was 14 when Sirhan Sirhan killed his father, who was running for president.

After his father’s death, the teenaged Kennedy experimented with drugs, like many of that generation’s youth. A reckless period spiraled into addiction and led to his arrest for heroin possession in 1983. He cleaned up, then embarked on a successful career as an environmental lawyer. He is also a professor at Pace University in White Plains, N.Y., where he runs a law clinic.

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Pallbearers, including a young Robert F. Kennedy Jr., carry the coffin of Sen. Robert Kennedy to the grave site at Arlington National Cemetery on June 8, 1968. (Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

He travels the country, giving 200 speeches a year, many on renewable energy. He sits on the boards of several green tech companies and is heavily involved in solar and wind power construction projects, with business that takes him to Europe, China and the Mideast.

His private life, befitting a Kennedy, has been fodder for the gossip pages. He had two children with his first wife, Emily Black. Three weeks after their divorce in 1994, he married Mary Richardson. They had four children, then Kennedy filed for divorce in 2010 and took up with Cheryl Hines, the actress who played Larry David’s wife on “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” They plan to marry in August at the Kennedy family compound in Hyannis Port, Mass. Mary took her own life in 2012. A year later, embarrassing 10-year-old entries from Kennedy’s private journals made tabloid headlines.

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